Guyana Presbyterian Church

The Guyana Presbyterian Church is a community of Christians, worshipping God and participating in God’s transformative love and justice in Guyana and in fellowship with people in the Caribbean and throughout the world.

Worship

We are a community of worship; praising the Triune God who sustains and strengthens us. We gather for worship on Sundays and throughout the week in various forms, living out our faith in Jesus Christ who calls us to witness for peace with justice and compassionate love.

Prayer

We are a praying community who seek God’s love, wisdom, understanding and guidance as we try to make sense of the world in which we live and relationships we share. We offer intercessions for persons who face various challenges in life. We believe in a God of all possibilities and hope.

Mission

We are a missional community, reaching out to serve women, men and children in their times of need. We serve local communities, our country as a whole and Caribbean sisters and brothers. We also connect with the worldwide community of Christians through our ecumenical partners.

Fellowship/Ecumenical

We are an ecumenical community. We share in ecumenical relations with the Guyana Council of Churches, the Caribbean Conference of Churches, the Caribbean and North America Area Council (CANAAC) of the World Communion of Reformed Churches (WCRC) and the Caribbean and North America Council for Mission (CANACOM) and the World Communion of Reformed Churches.

A Brief History

In 1880 John Morton, a Canadian Presbyterian missionary from Trinidad, visited British Guyana and recommended setting up a mission there. The Presbyterian Church in Canada sent John Gibson, who started work five years later in Demerara County. After his death it took several years before a new minister, J. B. Cropper, arrived at Better Hope in 1895. He spoke fluent Hindi with the Indians working on the plantations. By 1905 his endeavor had spread to all three colonies. Until 1945 the Guyana Presbyterian Church worked almost exclusively among East Indians employed on the sugar plantations. Schools and churches were established, but the church suffered from the heavy turnover of missionaries. A presbytery was formed in 1945, and the church became autonomous as the “Canadian Presbyterian Church in British Guyana.” In 1961 the name was changed to “Guyana Presbyterian Church.”

Contact Information

Email: [email protected]
Tel: + 592 222 4249